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The Revival of the Cord Automobile

Summary

The revival of the Cord automobile is a project that has long been rumored, but little is known about it. The Cord name has been surfacing again due to a change in the law that allows manufacturers to produce low-volume […]

The revival of the Cord automobile is a project that has long been rumored, but little is known about it. The Cord name has been surfacing again due to a change in the law that allows manufacturers to produce low-volume turnkey vehicles without following current safety regulations. As it turns out, the L-29 was chosen as the official pace car at the 2011 Indianapolis 500, and this event has increased the number of Cord owners.

The revival of the Cord automobile started in the late 1930s. The company first sold its 812 coupe in April 1936. The new car was equipped with a supercharger that boosted engine power to 170bhp and increased top speed to 110mph. The Cord’s ‘coffin-nose’ bonnet was adorned with chrome-plated exhaust pipes. The production of the 812 lasted until the end of 1937, when the final model was produced.

The Cord nameplate was popular in the 1920s and 1930s. The Cord Model 810 and the Cord 812 made the company a name for itself. It also became a popular luxury car among the Hollywood elite. Its production was short-lived. In the early 1960s, the Cord nameplate was used again. In 2014, the Cord Automobile Company sold the trademark and name rights to a new company.

At this time, Cord had several friends and associates who had experience in the automobile industry. These people included the late Harold T. Ames, who had previously worked for Duesenberg as its general manager. Cord’s trusty team included Harold T. Ames, the former president of Duesenberg, and the late John R. Reilly. As the years went by, he surrounded himself with loyal employees, including Jack Quinlan, who later hired him as a salesman.

In 1934, E. L. Cord hired the renowned car designer, Buehrig, to come up with a new design package for the company. The team was eager to begin work, but there was not enough money to continue. So Buehrig’s team opted for another company to help them. The result was a car that embodied the principles of the Cord, the Auburn, and the Ford ‘Flight’.

The Cord brand had a long history, but it didn’t capitalize on its innovations. Its reliability issues, such as slipping gear and vapor lock, dwindled the company’s dealer base. The company eventually went bankrupt, and the Cord name was no longer made. The Cord name was dropped after 70 years, but the company may be able to start production again under the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act of 2015.

The Cord automobile won numerous awards for design and performance. It was the first front-wheel-drive car in America, and it beat the rival Ruxton by several months. It also received accolades for safety and comfort. And while the Cord never became a major commercial success, it did become a favored car for racing enthusiasts. It was an iconic vehicle for the time, but the Cord has yet to find its way back into the market.

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